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Election 2012: Predictions

By on Nov 9, 2010 in Featured, News, Politics | 0 comments

Last week, the curtain closed on the 2010 election season. It mostly goes without saying that it’s been a a pretty wild midterm season (even though I just said it…), thanks primarily to the Tea Party insurgency. Utah wasn’t left out of the fun, either, despite becoming even more of a one-party state. Thankfully, for political junkies, that one party has a few sub-parties, most of them trying to out-conservative each other. Enough rambling, eh? After all, what I promised was predictions for 2012. A disclaimer: These are predictions made from my gut, which means I have not asked any of the politicians if they predictions pass the “sane” test. Frankly, most of them probably don’t, which makes them fun. After all, if I simply said that every incumbent is going to run for the same office, would you want to read any further? No. Okay, the predictions: U.S....

Six Pack on the Dashboard

By on Oct 8, 2010 in News, Politics | 0 comments

Above the Fold Ale: The Mormons are getting hit from the right and the left. As covered by every legitimate news outlet in the city today, thousands of protestors marched around Temple Square Thursday night to protest the speech made during last weekend’s LDS General Conference by President Boyd K. [Korn] Packer. Here’s the Trib’s coverage. The story isn’t ending, however. Associated Press’ Jennifer Dobner reports that national leaders from the Human Rights Campaign will hand-deliver 100,000 letters to the LDS Church that demand that Packer’s statements be retracted. And … the LDS Church has actually retracted some of those statements. According to the Trib’s Peggy Fletcher Stack, the text of Packer’s speech has been amended to remove the reference to God not making a “mistake” like creating gay people. From the other...

Six Pack on the Dashboard

By on Sep 28, 2010 in News, Politics | 0 comments

Above the Fold Ale: As long as I’ve covered government agencies, officials have been trying to find ways to skirt the Open Meetings Act and the Government Access and Records Management Aca (GRAMA). Sometimes, the moves were blatantly illegal, such as a city council trying to meet behind closed doors when the matter was clearly public. Other times, the methods were more devious, such as “random” encounters between 3 or 4 city council members at a cafe. Officials also tried to skirt the law with new technology, ranging from e-mail to text messages, and I can only imagine what will happen when elected leaders figure out how to direct message on Twitter. This weekend, BYU professor Joel Campbell—now writing for The Salt Lake Tribune as an open records guru — detailed a new proposal from the Utah Judicial Council that would allow certain records to reviewed in private...